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A DV(L)-FAQ [e]

DVL-Digest 908 - Postings:
Index


After Effects vs Commotion - (2)
DV Questions - (2)
Film editing - (2)


After Effects vs Commotion - Adam Wilt


Is anyone usine Adobe After Effects or Pinnacle Commotion in their NLE
> system?
Yes, many folks.
> Do they both do about the same things?
There's overlap, but they have different strengths.
After Effects is a compositing program first and foremost: it's designed to
take multiple still and moving images, and layer them together with motion,
filters, transparency, transfer modes, and other processing. Think of it as
Photoshop in motion.
Commotion is designed to rotoscope moving images, creating moving mattes and
doing things like wire removal and other fix-ups; motion-track objects or
entire scenes for matte creation, attaching effects to objects, or image
stabilization; and paint on scenes a frame at a time.
AE can do a bit of roto and motion tracking, and Commotion can do a bit of
compositing, but AE is a more powerful toolkit for compositing and Commotion
is better at roto and tracking.
Moving upscale you get discreet's Combustion, which is like AE and Commotion
rolled into one, plus a bit. Not to be confused with Conniption, which is the
fit the editor throws when he sees how much Combustion costs, even if it is
worth it! ;-)
Cheers,
Adam Wilt



After Effects vs Commotion - Adam Wilt


Is anyone usine Adobe After Effects or Pinnacle Commotion in their NLE
> system?
Yes, many folks.
> Do they both do about the same things?
There's overlap, but they have different strengths.
After Effects is a compositing program first and foremost: it's designed to
take multiple still and moving images, and layer them together with motion,
filters, transparency, transfer modes, and other processing. Think of it as
Photoshop in motion.
Commotion is designed to rotoscope moving images, creating moving mattes and
doing things like wire removal and other fix-ups; motion-track objects or
entire scenes for matte creation, attaching effects to objects, or image
stabilization; and paint on scenes a frame at a time.
AE can do a bit of roto and motion tracking, and Commotion can do a bit of
compositing, but AE is a more powerful toolkit for compositing and Commotion
is better at roto and tracking.
Moving upscale you get discreet's Combustion, which is like AE and Commotion
rolled into one, plus a bit. Not to be confused with Conniption, which is the
fit the editor throws when he sees how much Combustion costs, even if it is
worth it! ;-)
Cheers,
Adam Wilt



DV Questions - "Perry"


I am communicating with a young man and a PC who is rather too shy to ask
his questions direct, so I am doing it for him.
He basically doesn't like interlace, so:
1) Can he shoot in progressive mode with a Sony PC-110
2) Can he de-interlace with Ulead Video Studio 4 (but preserve some movement
blur)
3) If not, is there a cheap PC tool that can do this
On his behalf, this Mac user says thanks for your help.
Perry



DV Questions - "Perry"


I am communicating with a young man and a PC who is rather too shy to ask
his questions direct, so I am doing it for him.
He basically doesn't like interlace, so:
1) Can he shoot in progressive mode with a Sony PC-110
2) Can he de-interlace with Ulead Video Studio 4 (but preserve some movement
blur)
3) If not, is there a cheap PC tool that can do this
On his behalf, this Mac user says thanks for your help.
Perry



Film editing - Adam Wilt


I read an article "Format shootout bt Brian Boyl". I read it somewhere
> in the Internet, I don=B4t remember where, but it was originally posted
> to DV-L in March 1999. It's at http://www.unhollywood.com/appendix.htm
> There were some things I didn=B4t understand very well. Could you explain folowing terms: > Inter-positive > Inter-negative > an A/B roll answer print
> Check Print The film is shot on camera original film, nowadays almost always a negative
stock (in olden time reversal stock was often used, too). A "workprint" is
struck from the cam orig, so that you can (a) see a positive image, and (b)
cut & recut the workprint and scratch it up without ever damaging the cam
orig.
Once the workprint is cut, the negative (or reversal, if reversal was shot)
camera original is conformed ("negative cutting") so that it's edited to
exactly match the workprint. Because film cutting, unlike video editing, is a
destructive and not-recoverable process, so the cam orig is only cut once (by
strange, obsessed men & women in dark rooms. Neg cutters are a different
breed, possessed of great patience and fanatical attention to detail).
To perform effects such as dissolves, where two shots are overlapped, the film
is cut into "A & B rolls", parallel strands where the overlapping shots are
opposite each other. In 16mm especially, where splicing overlaps an adjacent
frame, the shots in the film alternate between the A & B rolls, so-called
"checkerboarding". The blank slugs between shots on each roll are filled with
black leader, an opaque bit of film that lets no light through. The effects
are made when the print is made by exposing the print stock to the A roll,
then the B roll, and controlling the light passing through the rolls so that
(for example) a fade-out on the A roll is supered atop a fade-in on the
B-roll, making a cross-dissolve. Where no superimpositions are called for,
you'll find that a shot on one roll is opposite black leader on the other, and
the printer light can be left on during the black leader as the leader blocks
the light (performing a lighting change on the printer requires a programming
step, and you pay per programming step as well as per foot!).
When the negs are cut, an "answer print" is made as a special, one-time run,
to check that all the cuts and effects are correct and proper. If tweaks are
needed, they are made, and another answer print is struck, and so on, until
everyone is happy.
At that point, it's time for mass-production. Because film is a fragile
medium, and "the negative is gold", one doesn't wish to strike the hundreds or
thousands of release prints (prints sent to theaters) directly from the
negative. Also, one doesn't want to use an expensive optical printer or even a
programmable contact printer, complete with filter packs and timing changes,
to make hundreds of prints one at a time. Instead, an intermediary copy is
made to be used as a duplication master; the copy can be thrashed with
impunity, and the copy incorporates all the filtering and lighting changes so
that copies made of the intermediary can be "one-lights" with no further fancy
footwork needed.
Indeed, the first intermediary may then be used to make an additionl set of
intermediaries from which release prints are made; it all depends on the film
and printing processes used and the number of release prints to be made. These
intermediaries are the inter-negative or interneg, and the inter-positive or
interpos, whether neg or pos depending on whether the image at that step is in
negative or positive form.
At any of the points a check print can be made as an additional quality
checkpoint. Because of the arcane nature of film printing, the internegs and
interposes [sic] are quite unwatchable; the neg is of course negative, and the
pos, even if positive, is typically lower in contrast and may have an odd
color cast to it, designed to compensate for contrast-intensifying and
color-distorting process of printing.
> and how is negative cutting made? First you do film to video transfer, edit video non-linear, but what do you do after that to have the final movie on the film.
In olden times, as I describe above, a workprint was made on film; now as you
mention most of the creative cutting is done on tape. When the film-to-tape
transfer is made, a log is kept relating the film's footage and frame numbers
to video reel and timecode [the film may also be keycoded (a form of frame
code or time code for film) or have Aaton CTR (clear time code -- is this
still in use?) a form of digital timecode exposed in the sprocket area. These
can be used in the log in place of reel # / footage / frame #]. The video also
typically has its timecode(or the film's keycode) burned into a window as
human-readable numbers.
When the video is cut, the source timecode is matched back to the film logs.
Some NLEs can perform this automatically with the aid of helper programs, or
there is always the old standby of manually matching the numbers (not fun!).
Sometimes a film workprint will be cut to the conformed logs, just to prove
there were no mistakes (again, cam orig is a "measure twice, cut once"
medium!), and then the cam orig is conformed to the logs or to the cut
workprint. And the whole process proceeds from there!
Hope that helps,
Adam "sniffed my share of film cement" Wilt



Film editing - Adam Wilt


I read an article "Format shootout bt Brian Boyl". I read it somewhere
> in the Internet, I don=B4t remember where, but it was originally posted
> to DV-L in March 1999. It's at http://www.unhollywood.com/appendix.htm
> There were some things I didn=B4t understand very well. Could you explain folowing terms: > Inter-positive > Inter-negative > an A/B roll answer print
> Check Print The film is shot on camera original film, nowadays almost always a negative
stock (in olden time reversal stock was often used, too). A "workprint" is
struck from the cam orig, so that you can (a) see a positive image, and (b)
cut & recut the workprint and scratch it up without ever damaging the cam
orig.
Once the workprint is cut, the negative (or reversal, if reversal was shot)
camera original is conformed ("negative cutting") so that it's edited to
exactly match the workprint. Because film cutting, unlike video editing, is a
destructive and not-recoverable process, so the cam orig is only cut once (by
strange, obsessed men & women in dark rooms. Neg cutters are a different
breed, possessed of great patience and fanatical attention to detail).
To perform effects such as dissolves, where two shots are overlapped, the film
is cut into "A & B rolls", parallel strands where the overlapping shots are
opposite each other. In 16mm especially, where splicing overlaps an adjacent
frame, the shots in the film alternate between the A & B rolls, so-called
"checkerboarding". The blank slugs between shots on each roll are filled with
black leader, an opaque bit of film that lets no light through. The effects
are made when the print is made by exposing the print stock to the A roll,
then the B roll, and controlling the light passing through the rolls so that
(for example) a fade-out on the A roll is supered atop a fade-in on the
B-roll, making a cross-dissolve. Where no superimpositions are called for,
you'll find that a shot on one roll is opposite black leader on the other, and
the printer light can be left on during the black leader as the leader blocks
the light (performing a lighting change on the printer requires a programming
step, and you pay per programming step as well as per foot!).
When the negs are cut, an "answer print" is made as a special, one-time run,
to check that all the cuts and effects are correct and proper. If tweaks are
needed, they are made, and another answer print is struck, and so on, until
everyone is happy.
At that point, it's time for mass-production. Because film is a fragile
medium, and "the negative is gold", one doesn't wish to strike the hundreds or
thousands of release prints (prints sent to theaters) directly from the
negative. Also, one doesn't want to use an expensive optical printer or even a
programmable contact printer, complete with filter packs and timing changes,
to make hundreds of prints one at a time. Instead, an intermediary copy is
made to be used as a duplication master; the copy can be thrashed with
impunity, and the copy incorporates all the filtering and lighting changes so
that copies made of the intermediary can be "one-lights" with no further fancy
footwork needed.
Indeed, the first intermediary may then be used to make an additionl set of
intermediaries from which release prints are made; it all depends on the film
and printing processes used and the number of release prints to be made. These
intermediaries are the inter-negative or interneg, and the inter-positive or
interpos, whether neg or pos depending on whether the image at that step is in
negative or positive form.
At any of the points a check print can be made as an additional quality
checkpoint. Because of the arcane nature of film printing, the internegs and
interposes [sic] are quite unwatchable; the neg is of course negative, and the
pos, even if positive, is typically lower in contrast and may have an odd
color cast to it, designed to compensate for contrast-intensifying and
color-distorting process of printing.
> and how is negative cutting made? First you do film to video transfer, edit video non-linear, but what do you do after that to have the final movie on the film.
In olden times, as I describe above, a workprint was made on film; now as you
mention most of the creative cutting is done on tape. When the film-to-tape
transfer is made, a log is kept relating the film's footage and frame numbers
to video reel and timecode [the film may also be keycoded (a form of frame
code or time code for film) or have Aaton CTR (clear time code -- is this
still in use?) a form of digital timecode exposed in the sprocket area. These
can be used in the log in place of reel # / footage / frame #]. The video also
typically has its timecode(or the film's keycode) burned into a window as
human-readable numbers.
When the video is cut, the source timecode is matched back to the film logs.
Some NLEs can perform this automatically with the aid of helper programs, or
there is always the old standby of manually matching the numbers (not fun!).
Sometimes a film workprint will be cut to the conformed logs, just to prove
there were no mistakes (again, cam orig is a "measure twice, cut once"
medium!), and then the cam orig is conformed to the logs or to the cut
workprint. And the whole process proceeds from there!
Hope that helps,
Adam "sniffed my share of film cement" Wilt




(diese posts stammen von der DV-L Mailingliste - THX to Adam Wilt and Perry Mitchell :-)


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